Please find below excerpts from articles written in the recent years, as well as links to the full texts:

  • Returning to their alma maters as teachers is something many former Guild film grads do.
    A great example is cinematographer/teacher Tal Lazar at AFI. Although he was a working Union camera assistant in his native Israel (with a BFA from Tel Aviv University), Lazar went “back to school” when he came to the States. “It was a conversation with a production designer back in Israel that made me decide,” he explains. “He described his process of working with a cinematographer, the information he requests and the types of discussions they have. These included technical discussions about the nature of optics and photographic processes, as well as artistic discussions about the interaction of color and contrast. I was confident in my abilities at the time, and yet I suddenly realized that I was unable to have a conversation at that level. This started me thinking about AFI.”

    ICG Magazine, February 2015
    Read the full Article here.
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  • Let Hoi Decide (aka De Mai Tihn 2), a film co-produced by South Korea’s CGV Entertainment and Vietnam’s Chanh Phuong Films, broke domestic records for Vietnamese cinema by earning $3.85 million, CJ Entertainment announced on Monday.
    Hollywood Reporter, January 2015
    Read the full Article here.
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  • Now, more than ever, it is about the story. We encourage filmmakers to forget about the technology for a while and concentrate on what’s important. It is about character, or small intimate moments as much as it is about monumental and breathtaking scenes. Find the story first, then find ways to tell it.
    HD Pro Guid, 2014 Vol. 2, Nov. 5
    Read the full Article here.
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  • Teo Em marked record breaking film in Vietnam for 2014.
    Hollywood Reporter, May 16 2014 (Cannes Issue): A review of South East Asia’s film markets.
    Read the full Article here.
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  • It all starts with a very creative exchange with the director. We’ll send each other photos by photographers or painters; we’ll go to galleries and concerts. We’re dealing with a medium in which we don’t always want to put what we feel into words. We try to give each other the experience of what it is exactly we’re looking for. Once we’re there, it’s my job as a cinematographer to take those ideas and turn them into things that are very, very practical. I need to take the feeling I discussed with the director and translate that into dollies and lamps and cameras.
    Sekonic online classroom Interview
    Read the full Article here.
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  • Lazar says camera movement underscored the main character’s turmoil and ultimate demise. “The more agony he begins to feel, the more movement we used,” he explains. “However, we didn’t want the audience to necessarily feel those camera moves, so we decided against handheld and Steadicam, and mostly used a tripod or dolly.”
    Kodak’s InCamera, January 2010
    Read the full Article here.

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